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Updated: Child Tax Credit FAQ on IRS.gov

Updated: Child Tax Credit FAQ on IRS.gov

The Internal Revenue Service is pushing out more information for taxpayers interested in the Child Tax Credit and its advance payments.

The IRS has updated its online list of frequently asked questions, or FAQs, for the 2021 Child Tax Credit and the Advance Child Tax Credit Payments.

The new verbiage describes how taxpayers can provide an estimate of their 2021 income to the IRS using the Child Tax Credit Update Portal (CTC UP).

The FAQs, the IRS says, are being updated to give more information to taxpayers and tax professionals alike as quickly as possible. The information for tax pros includes helpful advice on how practitioners can rely on the data within the Internal Revenue Bulletin—beyond that provided only in the FAQs.

More on the Advance Child Tax Credit

Beyond the updated FAQs, the IRS has also come up with a special web page on the Advance Child Tax Credit Payments in 2021. It aims to deliver up-to-date information about the credit and its advance payments. Visit the new web page at IRS.gov/childtaxcredit2021.

In order to help non-filers, low-income families and other underserved groups sign up for the credit, the IRS urges its partner organizations and community groups to share their information and take advantage of the agency’s online tools and toolkits.

Individuals can check whether they are eligible for the credit by visiting the Advance Child Tax Credit Eligibility Assistant.

The tool has its own set of frequently asked questions as well as direct links to the portal, links to the Non-filer Sign-up Tool and to the Child Tax Credit Eligibility Assistant, and other helpful resources.

Sources: IR-2021-218; General Overview of Taxpayer Reliance on Guidance Published in the Internal Revenue Bulletin and FAQs 

Bob Williams

Forget genes; I’ve got words in my DNA. Communication has been part of who I am nearly all my life. From a long career in radio news to another one in newspapers – and a University of Georgia journalism degree sandwiched between the two – language has been my life. I’ve also been fortunate to have learned the tax business from the ground up here at Drake, starting with 1040.com online forms some years ago before moving on to work on the Web. In all things tax-ish, we aim to give you tools you can use.

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