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IRS Still Has Some 2013 Tax Refunds

We’ve always been skeptical of that old marketing phrase, “Free Money.” But some taxpayers who filed their 2013 returns may still have a tax refund waiting for them.

The Internal Revenue Service says some $1 billion – yes, that’s billion, with a “b” – in unclaimed refunds is waiting for their taxpayers to come forward. To claim the refund, taxpayers have to file a tax year 2013 income tax return before the April 18 tax deadline.

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen says approximately 1 million taxpayers have a refund coming from their 2013 taxes, but didn’t file.

“People across the nation haven’t filed tax returns to claim these refunds, and their window of opportunity is closing soon. Students and many others may not realize they’re due a tax refund. Remember, there’s no penalty for filing a late return if you’re due a refund,” Koskinen said.

The midpoint for the 2013 refunds is about $763; half of the refunds are more than $763, half of them are less.

When a tax return hasn’t been filed, taxpayers have a three-year window for claiming their refund. After three years, unclaimed refunds become property of the U.S. Treasury. Also, taxpayers who seek a 2013 refund could have their checks held if they haven’t filed returns for 2014 and 2015. The refund may also be applied to any tax due owed to the IRS or a state tax agency, or to offset unpaid child support or past due federal debts such as student loans.

The refunds awaiting their rightful taxpayers don’t just refund taxes withheld or paid during 2013. They also include amounts refunded from the Earned Income Tax Credit, which could be worth as much as $6,044 in 2013.

Taxpayers seeking a 2013 refund will need their Forms W-2, 1098, 1099 or 5498 for the 2013 tax year, and should request them from their employer, bank or other payers.

NOTE: FOLLOWING IS A TABLE COPIED FROM THE IRS RELEASE. It is a state-by-state estimate of taxpayers who may be due a 2013 tax refund.

State or District Estimated

Number of

Individuals

Median

Potential

Refund

Total

Potential

Refunds*

Alabama 18,100 $729 $17,549,000
Alaska 4,700 $917 $5,665,000
Arizona 24,800 $650 $22,642,000
Arkansas 9,900 $722 $9,571,000
California 97,200 $696 $93,406,000
Colorado 20,200 $699 $19,454,000
Connecticut 11,500 $846 $12,691,000
Delaware 4,300 $776 $4,321,000
District of Columbia 3,200 $762 $3,341,000
Florida 66,900 $776 $67,758,000
Georgia 34,400 $671 $32,082,000
Hawaii 6,500 $793 $6,876,000
Idaho 4,500 $619 $3,919,000
Illinois 40,000 $834 $42,673,000
Indiana 21,700 $788 $22,060,000
Iowa 10,200 $808 $10,193,000
Kansas 11,100 $746 $10,700,000
Kentucky 12,900 $772 $12,627,000
Louisiana 20,300 $767 $21,209,000
Maine 4,000 $715 $3,645,000
Maryland 22,200 $770 $23,080,000
Massachusetts 23,000 $838 $24,950,000
Michigan 33,600 $763 $33,998,000
Minnesota 15,600 $691 $14,544,000
Mississippi 10,400 $702 $10,041,000
Missouri 22,400 $705 $20,787,000
Montana 3,600 $727 $3,480,000
Nebraska 5,300 $745 $5,084,000
Nevada 12,300 $753 $12,078,000
New Hampshire 4,400 $892 $4,930,000
New Jersey 29,900 $873 $33,207,000
New Mexico 8,100 $753 $8,162,000
New York 54,700 $847 $59,416,000
North Carolina 29,800 $656 $26,874,000
North Dakota 2,900 $888 $3,209,000
Ohio 36,000 $749 $34,547,000
Oklahoma 17,700 $773 $17,979,000
Oregon 15,500 $658 $14,188,000
Pennsylvania 39,400 $835 $41,078,000
Rhode Island 2,900 $796 $2,906,000
South Carolina 12,100 $674 $11,267,000
South Dakota 2,700 $823 $2,709,000
Tennessee 19,500 $743 $18,829,000
Texas 104,700 $829 $115,580,000
Utah 7,900 $667 $7,443,000
Vermont 2,000 $747 $1,859,000
Virginia 29,000 $752 $29,578,000
Washington 27,600 $829 $30,330,000
West Virginia 5,000 $855 $5,258,000
Wisconsin 12,700 $675 $11,619,000
Wyoming 2,800 $911 $3,189,000
Totals 1,042,100 $763 $1,054,581,000

* Excluding the Earned Income Tax Credit and other credits.

 

Bob Williams

Forget genes; I’ve got words in my DNA. Communication has been part of who I am nearly all my life. From a long career in radio news to another one in newspapers – and a University of Georgia journalism degree sandwiched between the two – language has been my life. I’ve also been fortunate to have learned the tax business from the ground up here at Drake, starting with 1040.com online forms some years ago before moving on to work on the Web. In all things tax-ish, we aim to give you tools you can use.

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