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Drake Software 2022 How Do Your Tax Prep Fees Stack Up? [Infographic]

Drake Software 2022 How Do Your Tax Prep Fees Stack Up? [Infographic]

The results of the How Do Your Tax Prep Fees Stack Up? survey are in!

Drake Software surveyed 3,620 tax professionals to learn what they plan to charge for tax preparation services during the 2023 filing season. Respondents answered more than 15 questions covering fee-related topics, including:

  • How they intend to charge for services
  • Whether they intend to increase fees
  • Which payment options they accept
  • What they plan to charge per form

In addition to detailing this information, the resulting infographic contains an appendix that organizes responses by demographic information, like state, local market, professional credentials, and the anticipated number of prepared returns.

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Tax professionals are planning to increase their fees for the 2023 filing season

One of the most surprising findings is that tax professionals are planning an across-the-board 10% increase in form-based fees compared to last year. Here are those percentages by form:

  • 1040: 12%
  • 1040 + Schedule A: 10%
  • 1040 + Schedule C: 11%
  • 1065: 13%
  • 1120: 10%
  • 1120-S: 10%
  • 1041: 13%
  • 990: 4%
  • 706: 7%

To learn how much preparers will charge next year, get your free copy of the 2022 How Do Your Tax Prep Fees Stack Up? Infographic.

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Ryan Norton

Whether designing superheroes, penciling caricatures, or just doodling, I always knew I was going to earn some sort of art degree while in college. That was my goal before I decided to trade Edgar Degas for Edgar Allan Poe during a Freshman English class. The BA in English soon morphed into a double-major in English and Philosophy, eventually becoming an MA in English. It only makes sense that I learned of a writing opportunity for a local marketing firm while teaching a first-year college English course. Before I knew it, I was writing and editing tax-related articles for Taxing Subjects, and this has been my home since 2014.

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